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ON THE ELECTRODYNAMICS OF MOVING
BODIES
By A. EINSTEIN
June 30, 1905
It is known that Maxwell’s electrodynamics—as usually understood at the
present time—when applied to moving bodies, leads to asymmetries which do
not appear to be inherent in the phenomena. Take, for example, the reciprocal
electrodynamic action of a magnet and a conductor. The observable phenomenon
here depends only on the relative motion of the conductor and the
magnet, whereas the customary view draws a sharp distinction between the two
cases in which either the one or the other of these bodies is in motion. For if the
magnet is in motion and the conductor at rest, there arises in the neighbourhood
of the magnet an electric field with a certain definite energy, producing
a current at the places where parts of the conductor are situated. But if the
magnet is stationary and the conductor in motion, no electric field arises in the
neighbourhood of the magnet. In the conductor, however, we find an electromotive
force, to which in itself there is no corresponding energy, but which gives
rise—assuming equality of relative motion in the two cases discussed—to electric
currents of the same path and intensity as those produced by the electric
forces in the former case.
Examples of this sort, together with the unsuccessful attempts to discover
any motion of the earth relatively to the “light medium,” suggest that the
phenomena of electrodynamics as well as of mechanics possess no properties
corresponding to the idea of absolute rest. They suggest rather that, as has
already been shown to the first order of small quantities, the same laws of
electrodynamics and optics will be valid for all frames of reference for which the
equations of mechanics hold good.1 We will raise this conjecture (the purport
of which will hereafter be called the “Principle of Relativity”) to the status
of a postulate, and also introduce another postulate, which is only apparently
irreconcilable with the former, namely, that light is always propagated in empty
space with a definite velocity c which is independent of the state of motion of the
emitting body. These two postulates suffice for the attainment of a simple and
consistent theory of the electrodynamics of moving bodies based on Maxwell’s
theory for stationary bodies. The introduction of a “luminiferous ether” will
prove to be superfluous inasmuch as the view here to be developed will not
require an “absolutely stationary space” provided with special properties, nor
1The preceding memoir by Lorentz was not at this time known to the author.
1
assign a velocity-vector to a point of the empty space in which electromagnetic
processes take place.
The theory to be developed is based—like all electrodynamics—on the kinematics
of the rigid body, since the assertions of any such theory have to do
with the relationships between rigid bodies (systems of co-ordinates), clocks,
and electromagnetic processes. Insufficient consideration of this circumstance
lies at the root of the difficulties which the electrodynamics of moving bodies
at present encounters.
I. KINEMATICAL PART
§ 1. Definition of Simultaneity
Let us take a system of co-ordinates in which the equations of Newtonian
mechanics hold good.2
In order to render our presentation more precise and
to distinguish this system of co-ordinates verbally from others which will be
introduced hereafter, we call it the “stationary system.”
If a material point is at rest relatively to this system of co-ordinates, its
position can be defined relatively thereto by the employment of rigid standards
of measurement and the methods of Euclidean geometry, and can be expressed
in Cartesian co-ordinates.
If we wish to describe the motion of a material point, we give the values of
its co-ordinates as functions of the time. Now we must bear carefully in mind
that a mathematical description of this kind has no physical meaning unless
we are quite clear as to what we understand by “time.” We have to take into
account that all our judgments in which time plays a part are always judgments
of simultaneous events. If, for instance, I say, “That train arrives here at 7
o’clock,” I mean something like this: “The pointing of the small hand of my
watch to 7 and the arrival of the train are simultaneous events.”3
It might appear possible to overcome all the difficulties attending the definition
of “time” by substituting “the position of the small hand of my watch” for
“time.” And in fact such a definition is satisfactory when we are concerned with
defining a time exclusively for the place where the watch is located; but it is no
longer satisfactory when we have to connect in time series of events occurring
at different places, or—what comes to the same thing—to evaluate the times of
events occurring at places remote from the watch.
We might, of course, content ourselves with time values determined by an
observer stationed together with the watch at the origin of the co-ordinates,
and co-ordinating the corresponding positions of the hands with light signals,
given out by every event to be timed, and reaching him through empty space.
But this co-ordination has the disadvantage that it is not independent of the
standpoint of the observer with the watch or clock, as we know from experience.
2
i.e. to the first approximation.
3We shall not here discuss the inexactitude which lurks in the concept of simultaneity of
two events at approximately the same place, which can only be removed by an abstraction.
2
We arrive at a much more practical determination along the following line of
thought.
If at the point A of space there is a clock, an observer at A can determine the
time values of events in the immediate proximity of A by finding the positions
of the hands which are simultaneous with these events. If there is at the point B
of space another clock in all respects resembling the one at A, it is possible for
an observer at B to determine the time values of events in the immediate neighbourhood
of B. But it is not possible without further assumption to compare,
in respect of time, an event at A with an event at B. We have so far defined
only an “A time” and a “B time.” We have not defined a common “time” for
A and B, for the latter cannot be defined at all unless we establish by definition
that the “time” required by light to travel from A to B equals the “time” it
requires to travel from B to A. Let a ray of light start at the “A time” tA from
A towards B, let it at the “B time” tB be reflected at B in the direction of A,
and arrive again at A at the “A time” t
0
A.
In accordance with definition the two clocks synchronize if
tB − tA = t
0
A − tB.
We assume that this definition of synchronism is free from contradictions,
and possible for any number of points; and that the following relations are
universally valid:—
1. If the clock at B synchronizes with the clock at A, the clock at A synchronizes
with the clock at B.
2. If the clock at A synchronizes with the clock at B and also with the clock
at C, the clocks at B and C also synchronize with each other.
Thus with the help of certain imaginary physical experiments we have settled
what is to be understood by synchronous stationary clocks located at different
places, and have evidently obtained a definition of “simultaneous,” or
“synchronous,” and of “time.” The “time” of an event is that which is given
simultaneously with the event by a stationary clock located at the place of
the event, this clock being synchronous, and indeed synchronous for all time
determinations, with a specified stationary clock.
In agreement with experience we further assume the quantity
2AB
t
0
A − tA
= c,
to be a universal constant—the velocity of light in empty space.
It is essential to have time defined by means of stationary clocks in the
stationary system, and the time now defined being appropriate to the stationary
system we call it “the time of the stationary system.”
§ 2. On the Relativity of Lengths and Times
The following reflexions are based on the principle of relativity and on the
principle of the constancy of the velocity of light. These two principles we define
as follows:—
3
1. The laws by which the states of physical systems undergo change are not
affected, whether these changes of state be referred to the one or the other of
two systems of co-ordinates in uniform translatory motion.
2. Any ray of light moves in the “stationary” system of co-ordinates with
the determined velocity c, whether the ray be emitted by a stationary or by a
moving body. Hence
velocity = light path
time interval
where time interval is to be taken in the sense of the definition in § 1.
Let there be given a stationary rigid rod; and let its length be l as measured
by a measuring-rod which is also stationary. We now imagine the axis of the
rod lying along the axis of x of the stationary system of co-ordinates, and that
a uniform motion of parallel translation with velocity v along the axis of x in
the direction of increasing x is then imparted to the rod. We now inquire as to
the length of the moving rod, and imagine its length to be ascertained by the
following two operations:—
(a) The observer moves together with the given measuring-rod and the rod
to be measured, and measures the length of the rod directly by superposing the
measuring-rod, in just the same way as if all three were at rest.
(b) By means of stationary clocks set up in the stationary system and synchronizing
in accordance with § 1, the observer ascertains at what points of the
stationary system the two ends of the rod to be measured are located at a definite
time. The distance between these two points, measured by the measuring-rod
already employed, which in this case is at rest, is also a length which may be
designated “the length of the rod.”
In accordance with the principle of relativity the length to be discovered by
the operation (a)—we will call it “the length of the rod in the moving system”—
must be equal to the length l of the stationary rod.
The length to be discovered by the operation (b) we will call “the length
of the (moving) rod in the stationary system.” This we shall determine on the
basis of our two principles, and we shall find that it differs from l.
Current kinematics tacitly assumes that the lengths determined by these two
operations are precisely equal, or in other words, that a moving rigid body at
the epoch t may in geometrical respects be perfectly represented by the same
body at rest in a definite position.
We imagine further that at the two ends A and B of the rod, clocks are
placed which synchronize with the clocks of the stationary system, that is to say
that their indications correspond at any instant to the “time of the stationary
system” at the places where they happen to be. These clocks are therefore
“synchronous in the stationary system.”
We imagine further that with each clock there is a moving observer, and
that these observers apply to both clocks the criterion established in § 1 for the
synchronization of two clocks. Let a ray of light depart from A at the time4
tA,
4“Time” here denotes “time of the stationary system” and also “position of hands of the
moving clock situated at the place under discussion.”
4
let it be reflected at B at the time tB, and reach A again at the time t
0
A. Taking
into consideration the principle of the constancy of the velocity of light we find
that
tB − tA =
rAB
c − v
and t
0
A − tB =
rAB
c + v
where rAB denotes the length of the moving rod—measured in the stationary
system. Observers moving with the moving rod would thus find that the two
clocks were not synchronous, while observers in the stationary system would
declare the clocks to be synchronous.
So we see that we cannot attach any absolute signification to the concept of
simultaneity, but that two events which, viewed from a system of co-ordinates,
are simultaneous, can no longer be looked upon as simultaneous events when
envisaged from a system which is in motion relatively to that system.
§ 3. Theory of the Transformation of Co-ordinates and
Times from a Stationary System to another System in
Uniform Motion of Translation Relatively to the Former
Let us in “stationary” space take two systems of co-ordinates, i.e. two systems,
each of three rigid material lines, perpendicular to one another, and issuing
from a point. Let the axes of X of the two systems coincide, and their axes of
Y and Z respectively be parallel. Let each system be provided with a rigid
measuring-rod and a number of clocks, and let the two measuring-rods, and
likewise all the clocks of the two systems, be in all respects alike.
Now to the origin of one of the two systems (k) let a constant velocity v
be imparted in the direction of the increasing x of the other stationary system
(K), and let this velocity be communicated to the axes of the co-ordinates, the
relevant measuring-rod, and the clocks. To any time of the stationary system K
there then will correspond a definite position of the axes of the moving system,
and from reasons of symmetry we are entitled to assume that the motion of k
may be such that the axes of the moving system are at the time t (this “t” always
denotes a time of the stationary system) parallel to the axes of the stationary
system.
We now imagine space to be measured from the stationary system K by
means of the stationary measuring-rod, and also from the moving system k
by means of the measuring-rod moving with it; and that we thus obtain the
co-ordinates x, y, z, and ξ, η, ζ respectively. Further, let the time t of the
stationary system be determined for all points thereof at which there are clocks
by means of light signals in the manner indicated in § 1; similarly let the time
τ of the moving system be determined for all points of the moving system at
which there are clocks at rest relatively to that system by applying the method,
given in § 1, of light signals between the points at which the latter clocks are
located.
To any system of values x, y, z, t, which completely defines the place and
time of an event in the stationary system, there belongs a system of values ξ,
5
η, ζ, τ , determining that event relatively to the system k, and our task is now
to find the system of equations connecting these quantities.
In the first place it is clear that the equations must be linear on account of
the properties of homogeneity which we attribute to space and time.
If we place x
0 = x − vt, it is clear that a point at rest in the system k must
have a system of values x
0
, y, z, independent of time. We first define τ as a
function of x
0
, y, z, and t. To do this we have to express in equations that τ is
nothing else than the summary of the data of clocks at rest in system k, which
have been synchronized according to the rule given in § 1.
From the origin of system k let a ray be emitted at the time τ0 along the
X-axis to x
0
, and at the time τ1 be reflected thence to the origin of the coordinates,
arriving there at the time τ2; we then must have 1
2
(τ0 + τ2) = τ1, or,
by inserting the arguments of the function τ and applying the principle of the
constancy of the velocity of light in the stationary system:—
1
2

τ (0, 0, 0, t) + τ

0, 0, 0, t +
x
0
c − v
+
x
0
c + v
 = τ

x
0
, 0, 0, t +
x
0
c − v

.
Hence, if x
0 be chosen infinitesimally small,
1
2

1
c − v
+
1
c + v

∂τ
∂t =
∂τ
∂x0
+
1
c − v
∂τ
∂t ,
or
∂τ
∂x0
+
v
c
2 − v
2
∂τ
∂t = 0.
It is to be noted that instead of the origin of the co-ordinates we might have
chosen any other point for the point of origin of the ray, and the equation just
obtained is therefore valid for all values of x
0
, y, z.
An analogous consideration—applied to the axes of Y and Z—it being borne
in mind that light is always propagated along these axes, when viewed from the
stationary system, with the velocity √
c
2 − v
2 gives us
∂τ
∂y = 0,
∂τ
∂z = 0.
Since τ is a linear function, it follows from these equations that
τ = a

t −
v
c
2 − v
2
x
0

where a is a function φ(v) at present unknown, and where for brevity it is
assumed that at the origin of k, τ = 0, when t = 0.
With the help of this result we easily determine the quantities ξ, η, ζ by
expressing in equations that light (as required by the principle of the constancy
of the velocity of light, in combination with the principle of relativity) is also
6
propagated with velocity c when measured in the moving system. For a ray of
light emitted at the time τ = 0 in the direction of the increasing ξ
ξ = cτ or ξ = ac 
t −
v
c
2 − v
2
x
0

.
But the ray moves relatively to the initial point of k, when measured in the
stationary system, with the velocity c − v, so that
x
0
c − v
= t.
If we insert this value of t in the equation for ξ, we obtain
ξ = a
c
2
c
2 − v
2
x
0
.
In an analogous manner we find, by considering rays moving along the two other
axes, that
η = cτ = ac 
t −
v
c
2 − v
2
x
0

when
y

c
2 − v
2
= t, x0 = 0.
Thus
η = a
c

c
2 − v
2
y and ζ = a
c

c
2 − v
2
z.
Substituting for x
0
its value, we obtain
τ = φ(v)β(t − vx/c2
),
ξ = φ(v)β(x − vt),
η = φ(v)y,
ζ = φ(v)z,
where
β =
1
p
1 − v
2/c2
,
and φ is an as yet unknown function of v. If no assumption whatever be made
as to the initial position of the moving system and as to the zero point of τ , an
additive constant is to be placed on the right side of each of these equations.
7
We now have to prove that any ray of light, measured in the moving system,
is propagated with the velocity c, if, as we have assumed, this is the case in the
stationary system; for we have not as yet furnished the proof that the principle
of the constancy of the velocity of light is compatible with the principle of
relativity.
At the time t = τ = 0, when the origin of the co-ordinates is common to the
two systems, let a spherical wave be emitted therefrom, and be propagated with
the velocity c in system K. If (x, y, z) be a point just attained by this wave,
then
x
2 + y
2 + z
2 = c
2
t
2
.
Transforming this equation with the aid of our equations of transformation
we obtain after a simple calculation
ξ
2 + η
2 + ζ
2 = c
2
τ
2
.
The wave under consideration is therefore no less a spherical wave with
velocity of propagation c when viewed in the moving system. This shows that
our two fundamental principles are compatible.5
In the equations of transformation which have been developed there enters
an unknown function φ of v, which we will now determine.
For this purpose we introduce a third system of co-ordinates K0
, which relatively
to the system k is in a state of parallel translatory motion parallel to
the axis of Ξ,†
such that the origin of co-ordinates of system K0 moves with
velocity −v on the axis of Ξ. At the time t = 0 let all three origins coincide, and
when t = x = y = z = 0 let the time t
0 of the system K0 be zero. We call the
co-ordinates, measured in the system K0
, x
0
, y
0
, z
0
, and by a twofold application
of our equations of transformation we obtain
t
0 = φ(−v)β(−v)(τ + vξ/c2
) = φ(v)φ(−v)t,
x
0 = φ(−v)β(−v)(ξ + vτ ) = φ(v)φ(−v)x,
y
0 = φ(−v)η = φ(v)φ(−v)y,
z
0 = φ(−v)ζ = φ(v)φ(−v)z.
Since the relations between x
0
, y
0
, z
0 and x, y, z do not contain the time t,
the systems K and K0 are at rest with respect to one another, and it is clear that
the transformation from K to K0 must be the identical transformation. Thus
φ(v)φ(−v) = 1.
5The equations of the Lorentz transformation may be more simply deduced directly from
the condition that in virtue of those equations the relation x
2 + y
2 + z
2 = c
2
t
2
shall have as
its consequence the second relation ξ
2 + η
2 + ζ
2 = c

2
.
†Editor’s note: In Einstein’s original paper, the symbols (Ξ, H, Z) for the co-ordinates of the
moving system k were introduced without explicitly defining them. In the 1923 English translation,
(X, Y, Z) were used, creating an ambiguity between X co-ordinates in the fixed system K and the
parallel axis in moving system k. Here and in subsequent references we use Ξ when referring to the
axis of system k along which the system is translating with respect to K. In addition, the reference
to system K0
later in this sentence was incorrectly given as “k” in the 1923 English translation.
8
We now inquire into the signification of φ(v). We give our attention to that
part of the axis of Y of system k which lies between ξ = 0, η = 0, ζ = 0 and
ξ = 0, η = l, ζ = 0. This part of the axis of Y is a rod moving perpendicularly
to its axis with velocity v relatively to system K. Its ends possess in K the
co-ordinates
x1 = vt, y1 =
l
φ(v)
, z1 = 0
and
x2 = vt, y2 = 0, z2 = 0.
The length of the rod measured in K is therefore l/φ(v); and this gives us the
meaning of the function φ(v). From reasons of symmetry it is now evident that
the length of a given rod moving perpendicularly to its axis, measured in the
stationary system, must depend only on the velocity and not on the direction
and the sense of the motion. The length of the moving rod measured in the
stationary system does not change, therefore, if v and −v are interchanged.
Hence follows that l/φ(v) = l/φ(−v), or
φ(v) = φ(−v).
It follows from this relation and the one previously found that φ(v) = 1, so that
the transformation equations which have been found become
τ = β(t − vx/c2
),
ξ = β(x − vt),
η = y,
ζ = z,
where
β = 1/
p
1 − v
2/c2.
§ 4. Physical Meaning of the Equations Obtained in
Respect to Moving Rigid Bodies and Moving Clocks
We envisage a rigid sphere6 of radius R, at rest relatively to the moving
system k, and with its centre at the origin of co-ordinates of k. The equation of
the surface of this sphere moving relatively to the system K with velocity v is
ξ
2 + η
2 + ζ
2 = R2
.
6That is, a body possessing spherical form when examined at rest.
9
The equation of this surface expressed in x, y, z at the time t = 0 is
x
2
(
p
1 − v
2/c2)
2
+ y
2 + z
2 = R2
.
A rigid body which, measured in a state of rest, has the form of a sphere,
therefore has in a state of motion—viewed from the stationary system—the
form of an ellipsoid of revolution with the axes
R
p
1 − v
2/c2, R, R.
Thus, whereas the Y and Z dimensions of the sphere (and therefore of every
rigid body of no matter what form) do not appear modified by the motion, the
X dimension appears shortened in the ratio 1 : p
1 − v
2/c2, i.e. the greater the
value of v, the greater the shortening. For v = c all moving objects—viewed from
the “stationary” system—shrivel up into plane figures.† For velocities greater
than that of light our deliberations become meaningless; we shall, however, find
in what follows, that the velocity of light in our theory plays the part, physically,
of an infinitely great velocity.
It is clear that the same results hold good of bodies at rest in the “stationary”
system, viewed from a system in uniform motion.
Further, we imagine one of the clocks which are qualified to mark the time
t when at rest relatively to the stationary system, and the time τ when at rest
relatively to the moving system, to be located at the origin of the co-ordinates
of k, and so adjusted that it marks the time τ . What is the rate of this clock,
when viewed from the stationary system?
Between the quantities x, t, and τ , which refer to the position of the clock,
we have, evidently, x = vt and
τ =
1
p
1 − v
2/c2
(t − vx/c2
).
Therefore,
τ = t
p
1 − v
2/c2 = t − (1 −
p
1 − v
2/c2)t
whence it follows that the time marked by the clock (viewed in the stationary
system) is slow by 1 −
p
1 − v
2/c2 seconds per second, or—neglecting magnitudes
of fourth and higher order—by 1
2
v
2/c2
.
From this there ensues the following peculiar consequence. If at the points A
and B of K there are stationary clocks which, viewed in the stationary system,
are synchronous; and if the clock at A is moved with the velocity v along the
line AB to B, then on its arrival at B the two clocks no longer synchronize,
but the clock moved from A to B lags behind the other which has remained at
†Editor’s note: In the 1923 English translation, this phrase was erroneously translated as “plain
figures”. I have used the correct “plane figures” in this edition.
10
B by 1
2
tv2/c2
(up to magnitudes of fourth and higher order), t being the time
occupied in the journey from A to B.
It is at once apparent that this result still holds good if the clock moves from
A to B in any polygonal line, and also when the points A and B coincide.
If we assume that the result proved for a polygonal line is also valid for a
continuously curved line, we arrive at this result: If one of two synchronous
clocks at A is moved in a closed curve with constant velocity until it returns to
A, the journey lasting t seconds, then by the clock which has remained at rest
the travelled clock on its arrival at A will be 1
2
tv2/c2
second slow. Thence we
conclude that a balance-clock7 at the equator must go more slowly, by a very
small amount, than a precisely similar clock situated at one of the poles under
otherwise identical conditions.
§ 5. The Composition of Velocities
In the system k moving along the axis of X of the system K with velocity v,
let a point move in accordance with the equations
ξ = wξτ, η = wητ, ζ = 0,
where wξ and wη denote constants.
Required: the motion of the point relatively to the system K. If with the help
of the equations of transformation developed in § 3 we introduce the quantities
x, y, z, t into the equations of motion of the point, we obtain
x =
wξ + v
1 + vwξ/c2
t,
y =
p
1 − v
2/c2
1 + vwξ/c2
wηt,
z = 0.
Thus the law of the parallelogram of velocities is valid according to our
theory only to a first approximation. We set
V
2 =

dx
dt 2
+

dy
dt 2
,
w
2 = w
2
ξ + w
2
η
,
a = tan−1 wη/wξ,

7Not a pendulum-clock, which is physically a system to which the Earth belongs. This
case had to be excluded.
†Editor’s note: This equation was incorrectly given in Einstein’s original paper and the 1923
English translation as a = tan−1 wy/wx.
11
a is then to be looked upon as the angle between the velocities v and w. After
a simple calculation we obtain
V =
p
(v
2 + w2 + 2vw cos a) − (vw sin a/c)
2
1 + vw cos a/c2
.
It is worthy of remark that v and w enter into the expression for the resultant
velocity in a symmetrical manner. If w also has the direction of the axis of X,
we get
V =
v + w
1 + vw/c2
.
It follows from this equation that from a composition of two velocities which
are less than c, there always results a velocity less than c. For if we set v =
c − κ, w = c − λ, κ and λ being positive and less than c, then
V = c
2c − κ − λ
2c − κ − λ + κλ/c < c.
It follows, further, that the velocity of light c cannot be altered by composition
with a velocity less than that of light. For this case we obtain
V =
c + w
1 + w/c = c.
We might also have obtained the formula for V, for the case when v and w have
the same direction, by compounding two transformations in accordance with §
3. If in addition to the systems K and k figuring in § 3 we introduce still another
system of co-ordinates k
0 moving parallel to k, its initial point moving on the
axis of Ξ† with the velocity w, we obtain equations between the quantities x,
y, z, t and the corresponding quantities of k
0
, which differ from the equations
found in § 3 only in that the place of “v” is taken by the quantity
v + w
1 + vw/c2
;
from which we see that such parallel transformations—necessarily—form a group.
We have now deduced the requisite laws of the theory of kinematics corresponding
to our two principles, and we proceed to show their application to
electrodynamics.
II. ELECTRODYNAMICAL PART
§ 6. Transformation of the Maxwell-Hertz Equations for
Empty Space. On the Nature of the Electromotive Forces
Occurring in a Magnetic Field During Motion
Let the Maxwell-Hertz equations for empty space hold good for the stationary
system K, so that we have
†Editor’s note: “X” in the 1923 English translation.
12
1
c
∂X
∂t =
∂N
∂y −
∂M
∂z ,
1
c
∂L
∂t =
∂Y
∂z −
∂Z
∂y ,
1
c
∂Y
∂t =
∂L
∂z −
∂N
∂x ,
1
c
∂M
∂t =
∂Z
∂x −
∂X
∂z ,
1
c
∂Z
∂t =
∂M
∂x −
∂L
∂y ,
1
c
∂N
∂t =
∂X
∂y −
∂Y
∂x ,
where (X, Y, Z) denotes the vector of the electric force, and (L, M, N) that of
the magnetic force.
If we apply to these equations the transformation developed in § 3, by referring
the electromagnetic processes to the system of co-ordinates there introduced,
moving with the velocity v, we obtain the equations
1
c
∂X
∂τ =

∂η n
β

N −
v
cY
o −

∂ζ n
β

M + v
c
Z
o ,
1
c

∂τ n
β

Y −
v
cN
o =
∂L
∂ξ −

∂ζ n
β

N −
v
cY
o ,
1
c

∂τ n
β

Z + v
cM
o =

∂ξ n
β

M + v
c
Z
o −
∂L
∂η ,
1
c
∂L
∂τ =

∂ζ n
β

Y −
v
cN
o −

∂η n
β

Z + v
cM
o ,
1
c

∂τ n
β

M + v
c
Z
o =

∂ξ n
β

Z + v
cM
o −
∂X
∂ζ ,
1
c

∂τ n
β

N −
v
cY
o =
∂X
∂η −

∂ξ n
β

Y −
v
cN
o ,
where
β = 1/
p
1 − v
2/c2.
Now the principle of relativity requires that if the Maxwell-Hertz equations
for empty space hold good in system K, they also hold good in system k; that
is to say that the vectors of the electric and the magnetic force—(X0
, Y0
, Z0
)
and (L0
, M0
, N0
)—of the moving system k, which are defined by their ponderomotive
effects on electric or magnetic masses respectively, satisfy the following
equations:—
1
c
∂X0
∂τ =
∂N0
∂η −
∂M0
∂ζ ,
1
c
∂L
0
∂τ =
∂Y0
∂ζ −
∂Z
0
∂η ,
1
c
∂Y0
∂τ =
∂L
0
∂ζ −
∂N0
∂ξ ,
1
c
∂M0
∂τ =
∂Z
0
∂ξ −
∂X0
∂ζ ,
1
c
∂Z
0
∂τ =
∂M0
∂ξ −
∂L
0
∂η ,
1
c
∂N0
∂τ =
∂X0
∂η −
∂Y0
∂ξ .
13
Evidently the two systems of equations found for system k must express
exactly the same thing, since both systems of equations are equivalent to the
Maxwell-Hertz equations for system K. Since, further, the equations of the two
systems agree, with the exception of the symbols for the vectors, it follows that
the functions occurring in the systems of equations at corresponding places must
agree, with the exception of a factor ψ(v), which is common for all functions
of the one system of equations, and is independent of ξ, η, ζ and τ but depends
upon v. Thus we have the relations
X0 = ψ(v)X, L
0 = ψ(v)L,
Y0 = ψ(v)β

Y −
v
c N

, M0 = ψ(v)β

M + v
c
Z

,
Z
0 = ψ(v)β

Z + v
c M

, N0 = ψ(v)β

N −
v
c Y

.
If we now form the reciprocal of this system of equations, firstly by solving
the equations just obtained, and secondly by applying the equations to the
inverse transformation (from k to K), which is characterized by the velocity −v,
it follows, when we consider that the two systems of equations thus obtained
must be identical, that ψ(v)ψ(−v) = 1. Further, from reasons of symmetry8
and therefore
ψ(v) = 1,
and our equations assume the form
X0 = X, L
0 = L,
Y0 = β

Y −
v
c N

, M0 = β

M + v
c
Z

,
Z
0 = β

Z + v
c M

, N0 = β

N −
v
c Y

.
As to the interpretation of these equations we make the following remarks: Let
a point charge of electricity have the magnitude “one” when measured in the
stationary system K, i.e. let it when at rest in the stationary system exert a
force of one dyne upon an equal quantity of electricity at a distance of one cm.
By the principle of relativity this electric charge is also of the magnitude “one”
when measured in the moving system. If this quantity of electricity is at rest
relatively to the stationary system, then by definition the vector (X, Y, Z) is
equal to the force acting upon it. If the quantity of electricity is at rest relatively
to the moving system (at least at the relevant instant), then the force acting
upon it, measured in the moving system, is equal to the vector (X0
, Y0
, Z0
).
Consequently the first three equations above allow themselves to be clothed in
words in the two following ways:—
1. If a unit electric point charge is in motion in an electromagnetic field,
there acts upon it, in addition to the electric force, an “electromotive force”
which, if we neglect the terms multiplied by the second and higher powers of
v/c, is equal to the vector-product of the velocity of the charge and the magnetic
force, divided by the velocity of light. (Old manner of expression.)
8
If, for example, X=Y=Z=L=M=0, and N 6= 0, then from reasons of symmetry it is clear
that when v changes sign without changing its numerical value, Y0 must also change sign
without changing its numerical value.
14
2. If a unit electric point charge is in motion in an electromagnetic field,
the force acting upon it is equal to the electric force which is present at the
locality of the charge, and which we ascertain by transformation of the field to
a system of co-ordinates at rest relatively to the electrical charge. (New manner
of expression.)
The analogy holds with “magnetomotive forces.” We see that electromotive
force plays in the developed theory merely the part of an auxiliary concept,
which owes its introduction to the circumstance that electric and magnetic forces
do not exist independently of the state of motion of the system of co-ordinates.
Furthermore it is clear that the asymmetry mentioned in the introduction
as arising when we consider the currents produced by the relative motion of a
magnet and a conductor, now disappears. Moreover, questions as to the “seat”
of electrodynamic electromotive forces (unipolar machines) now have no point.
§ 7. Theory of Doppler’s Principle and of Aberration
In the system K, very far from the origin of co-ordinates, let there be a
source of electrodynamic waves, which in a part of space containing the origin
of co-ordinates may be represented to a sufficient degree of approximation by
the equations
X = X0 sin Φ, L = L0 sin Φ,
Y = Y0 sin Φ, M = M0 sin Φ,
Z = Z0 sin Φ, N = N0 sin Φ,
where
Φ = ω

t −
1
c
(lx + my + nz)

.
Here (X0, Y0, Z0) and (L0, M0, N0) are the vectors defining the amplitude of
the wave-train, and l, m, n the direction-cosines of the wave-normals. We wish
to know the constitution of these waves, when they are examined by an observer
at rest in the moving system k.
Applying the equations of transformation found in § 6 for electric and magnetic
forces, and those found in § 3 for the co-ordinates and the time, we obtain
directly
X0 = X0 sin Φ0
, L
0 = L0 sin Φ0
,
Y0 = β(Y0 − vN0/c) sin Φ0
, M0 = β(M0 + vZ0/c) sin Φ0
,
Z
0 = β(Z0 + vM0/c) sin Φ0
, N0 = β(N0 − vY0/c) sin Φ0
,
Φ
0 = ω
0

τ −
1
c
(l
0
ξ + m0η + n
0
ζ)

where
ω
0 = ωβ(1 − lv/c),
15
l
0 =
l − v/c
1 − lv/c ,
m0 =
m
β(1 − lv/c)
,
n
0 =
n
β(1 − lv/c)
.
From the equation for ω
0
it follows that if an observer is moving with velocity
v relatively to an infinitely distant source of light of frequency ν, in such a way
that the connecting line “source-observer” makes the angle φ with the velocity
of the observer referred to a system of co-ordinates which is at rest relatively
to the source of light, the frequency ν
0 of the light perceived by the observer is
given by the equation
ν
0 = ν
1 − cos φ · v/c
p
1 − v
2/c2
.
This is Doppler’s principle for any velocities whatever. When φ = 0 the equation
assumes the perspicuous form
ν
0 = ν
s
1 − v/c
1 + v/c .
We see that, in contrast with the customary view, when v = −c, ν0 = ∞.
If we call the angle between the wave-normal (direction of the ray) in the
moving system and the connecting line “source-observer” φ
0
, the equation for
φ
0† assumes the form
cos φ
0 =
cos φ − v/c
1 − cos φ · v/c .
This equation expresses the law of aberration in its most general form. If φ =
1
2
π, the equation becomes simply
cos φ
0 = −v/c.
We still have to find the amplitude of the waves, as it appears in the moving
system. If we call the amplitude of the electric or magnetic force A or A0
respectively, accordingly as it is measured in the stationary system or in the
moving system, we obtain
A
02 = A2
(1 − cos φ · v/c)
2
1 − v
2/c2
which equation, if φ = 0, simplifies into
†Editor’s note: Erroneously given as “l
0” in the 1923 English translation, propagating an error,
despite a change in symbols, from the original 1905 paper.
16
A
02 = A2
1 − v/c
1 + v/c .
It follows from these results that to an observer approaching a source of light
with the velocity c, this source of light must appear of infinite intensity.
§ 8. Transformation of the Energy of Light Rays. Theory
of the Pressure of Radiation Exerted on Perfect Reflectors
Since A2/8π equals the energy of light per unit of volume, we have to regard
A02
/8π, by the principle of relativity, as the energy of light in the moving system.
Thus A02
/A2 would be the ratio of the “measured in motion” to the “measured
at rest” energy of a given light complex, if the volume of a light complex were
the same, whether measured in K or in k. But this is not the case. If l, m, n are
the direction-cosines of the wave-normals of the light in the stationary system,
no energy passes through the surface elements of a spherical surface moving
with the velocity of light:—
(x − lct)
2 + (y − mct)
2 + (z − nct)
2 = R2
.
We may therefore say that this surface permanently encloses the same light
complex. We inquire as to the quantity of energy enclosed by this surface,
viewed in system k, that is, as to the energy of the light complex relatively to
the system k.
The spherical surface—viewed in the moving system—is an ellipsoidal surface,
the equation for which, at the time τ = 0, is
(βξ − lβξv/c)
2 + (η − mβξv/c)
2 + (ζ − nβξv/c)
2 = R2
.
If S is the volume of the sphere, and S0
that of this ellipsoid, then by a simple
calculation
S
0
S
=
p
1 − v
2/c2
1 − cos φ · v/c .
Thus, if we call the light energy enclosed by this surface E when it is measured in
the stationary system, and E0 when measured in the moving system, we obtain
E
0
E
=
A02
S
0
A2S
=
1 − cos φ · v/c
p
1 − v
2/c2
,
and this formula, when φ = 0, simplifies into
E
0
E
=
s
1 − v/c
1 + v/c .
17
It is remarkable that the energy and the frequency of a light complex vary
with the state of motion of the observer in accordance with the same law.
Now let the co-ordinate plane ξ = 0 be a perfectly reflecting surface, at
which the plane waves considered in § 7 are reflected. We seek for the pressure
of light exerted on the reflecting surface, and for the direction, frequency, and
intensity of the light after reflexion.
Let the incidental light be defined by the quantities A, cos φ, ν (referred to
system K). Viewed from k the corresponding quantities are
A
0 = A1 − cos φ · v/c
p
1 − v
2/c2
,
cos φ
0 =
cos φ − v/c
1 − cos φ · v/c ,
ν
0 = ν
1 − cos φ · v/c
p
1 − v
2/c2
.
For the reflected light, referring the process to system k, we obtain
A
00 = A0
cos φ
00 = − cos φ
0
ν
00 = ν
0
Finally, by transforming back to the stationary system K, we obtain for the
reflected light
A
000 = A00 1 + cosφ00
· v/c
p
1 − v
2/c2
= A1 − 2 cos φ · v/c + v
2/c2
1 − v
2/c2
,
cos φ
000 =
cos φ
00 + v/c
1 + cos φ00 · v/c = −
(1 + v
2/c2
) cos φ − 2v/c
1 − 2 cos φ · v/c + v
2/c2
,
ν
000 = ν
00 1 + cos φ
00
· v/c
p
1 − v
2/c2
= ν
1 − 2 cos φ · v/c + v
2/c2
1 − v
2/c2
.
The energy (measured in the stationary system) which is incident upon unit
area of the mirror in unit time is evidently A2
(c cos φ−v)/8π. The energy leaving
the unit of surface of the mirror in the unit of time is A0002
(−c cos φ
000 + v)/8π.
The difference of these two expressions is, by the principle of energy, the work
done by the pressure of light in the unit of time. If we set down this work as
equal to the product Pv, where P is the pressure of light, we obtain
P = 2 ·
A2

(cos φ − v/c)
2
1 − v
2/c2
.
18
In agreement with experiment and with other theories, we obtain to a first
approximation
P = 2 ·
A2

cos2 φ.
All problems in the optics of moving bodies can be solved by the method
here employed. What is essential is, that the electric and magnetic force of the
light which is influenced by a moving body, be transformed into a system of
co-ordinates at rest relatively to the body. By this means all problems in the
optics of moving bodies will be reduced to a series of problems in the optics of
stationary bodies.
§ 9. Transformation of the Maxwell-Hertz Equations
when Convection-Currents are Taken into Account
We start from the equations
1
c
n
∂X
∂t + uxρ
o
=
∂N
∂y −
∂M
∂z ,
1
c
∂L
∂t =
∂Y
∂z −
∂Z
∂y ,
1
c
n
∂Y
∂t + uyρ
o
=
∂L
∂z −
∂N
∂x ,
1
c
∂M
∂t =
∂Z
∂x −
∂X
∂z ,
1
c
n
∂Z
∂t + uzρ
o
=
∂M
∂x −
∂L
∂y ,
1
c
∂N
∂t =
∂X
∂y −
∂Y
∂x ,
where
ρ =
∂X
∂x +
∂Y
∂y +
∂Z
∂z
denotes 4π times the density of electricity, and (ux, uy, uz) the velocity-vector of
the charge. If we imagine the electric charges to be invariably coupled to small
rigid bodies (ions, electrons), these equations are the electromagnetic basis of
the Lorentzian electrodynamics and optics of moving bodies.
Let these equations be valid in the system K, and transform them, with the
assistance of the equations of transformation given in §§ 3 and 6, to the system
k. We then obtain the equations
1
c
n
∂X0
∂τ + uξρ
0
o
=
∂N0
∂η −
∂M0
∂ζ ,
1
c
∂L
0
∂τ =
∂Y0
∂ζ −
∂Z
0
∂η ,
1
c
n
∂Y0
∂τ + uηρ
0
o
=
∂L
0
∂ζ −
∂N0
∂ξ ,
1
c
∂M0
∂τ =
∂Z
0
∂ξ −
∂X0
∂ζ ,
1
c
n
∂Z
0
∂τ + uζρ
0
o
=
∂M0
∂ξ −
∂L
0
∂η ,
1
c
∂N0
∂τ =
∂X0
∂η −
∂Y0
∂ξ ,
where
19
uξ =
ux − v
1 − uxv/c2
uη =
uy
β(1 − uxv/c2)
uζ =
uz
β(1 − uxv/c2)
,
and
ρ
0 =
∂X0
∂ξ +
∂Y0
∂η +
∂Z0
∂ζ
= β(1 − uxv/c2
)ρ.
Since—as follows from the theorem of addition of velocities (§ 5)—the vector
(uξ, uη, uζ ) is nothing else than the velocity of the electric charge, measured in
the system k, we have the proof that, on the basis of our kinematical principles,
the electrodynamic foundation of Lorentz’s theory of the electrodynamics of
moving bodies is in agreement with the principle of relativity.
In addition I may briefly remark that the following important law may easily
be deduced from the developed equations: If an electrically charged body is in
motion anywhere in space without altering its charge when regarded from a
system of co-ordinates moving with the body, its charge also remains—when
regarded from the “stationary” system K—constant.
§ 10. Dynamics of the Slowly Accelerated Electron
Let there be in motion in an electromagnetic field an electrically charged
particle (in the sequel called an “electron”), for the law of motion of which we
assume as follows:—
If the electron is at rest at a given epoch, the motion of the electron ensues
in the next instant of time according to the equations
m
d
2x
dt2
= X
m
d
2y
dt2
= Y
m
d
2
z
dt2
= Z
where x, y, z denote the co-ordinates of the electron, and m the mass of the
electron, as long as its motion is slow.
20
Now, secondly, let the velocity of the electron at a given epoch be v. We
seek the law of motion of the electron in the immediately ensuing instants of
time.
Without affecting the general character of our considerations, we may and
will assume that the electron, at the moment when we give it our attention, is at
the origin of the co-ordinates, and moves with the velocity v along the axis of X
of the system K. It is then clear that at the given moment (t = 0) the electron
is at rest relatively to a system of co-ordinates which is in parallel motion with
velocity v along the axis of X.
From the above assumption, in combination with the principle of relativity, it
is clear that in the immediately ensuing time (for small values of t) the electron,
viewed from the system k, moves in accordance with the equations
m
d
2
ξ
dτ 2
= X
0
,
m
d

dτ 2
= Y
0
,
m
d
2
ζ
dτ 2
= Z
0
,
in which the symbols ξ, η, ζ, X0
, Y0
, Z0
refer to the system k. If, further, we
decide that when t = x = y = z = 0 then τ = ξ = η = ζ = 0, the transformation
equations of §§ 3 and 6 hold good, so that we have
ξ = β(x − vt), η = y, ζ = z, τ = β(t − vx/c2
),
X0 = X, Y0 = β(Y − vN/c), Z
0 = β(Z + vM/c).
With the help of these equations we transform the above equations of motion
from system k to system K, and obtain
d
2x
dt2 =

mβ3 X
d
2y
dt2 =


Y −
v
c N

d
2
z
dt2 =


Z + v
c M




· · · (A)
Taking the ordinary point of view we now inquire as to the “longitudinal”
and the “transverse” mass of the moving electron. We write the equations (A)
in the form
mβ3 d
2x
dt2 = X = X0
,
mβ2 d
2y
dt2 = β
Y −
v
c N

= Y0
,
mβ2 d
2
z
dt2 = β
Z + v
c M

= Z
0
,
and remark firstly that X0
, Y0
, Z
0 are the components of the ponderomotive
force acting upon the electron, and are so indeed as viewed in a system moving
at the moment with the electron, with the same velocity as the electron. (This
force might be measured, for example, by a spring balance at rest in the lastmentioned
system.) Now if we call this force simply “the force acting upon the
21
electron,”9 and maintain the equation—mass × acceleration = force—and if we
also decide that the accelerations are to be measured in the stationary system
K, we derive from the above equations
Longitudinal mass = m
(
p
1 − v
2/c2)
3
.
Transverse mass = m
1 − v
2/c2
.
With a different definition of force and acceleration we should naturally
obtain other values for the masses. This shows us that in comparing different
theories of the motion of the electron we must proceed very cautiously.
We remark that these results as to the mass are also valid for ponderable
material points, because a ponderable material point can be made into an electron
(in our sense of the word) by the addition of an electric charge, no matter
how small.
We will now determine the kinetic energy of the electron. If an electron
moves from rest at the origin of co-ordinates of the system K along the axis
of X under the action of an electrostatic force X, it is clear that the energy
withdrawn from the electrostatic field has the value R
X dx. As the electron is
to be slowly accelerated, and consequently may not give off any energy in the
form of radiation, the energy withdrawn from the electrostatic field must be put
down as equal to the energy of motion W of the electron. Bearing in mind that
during the whole process of motion which we are considering, the first of the
equations (A) applies, we therefore obtain
W = Z
X dx = m
Z v
0
β
3
v dv
= mc2
(
1
p
1 − v
2/c2
− 1
)
.
Thus, when v = c, W becomes infinite. Velocities greater than that of light
have—as in our previous results—no possibility of existence.
This expression for the kinetic energy must also, by virtue of the argument
stated above, apply to ponderable masses as well.
We will now enumerate the properties of the motion of the electron which
result from the system of equations (A), and are accessible to experiment.
1. From the second equation of the system (A) it follows that an electric
force Y and a magnetic force N have an equally strong deflective action on an
electron moving with the velocity v, when Y = Nv/c. Thus we see that it is
possible by our theory to determine the velocity of the electron from the ratio
9The definition of force here given is not advantageous, as was first shown by M. Planck.
It is more to the point to define force in such a way that the laws of momentum and energy
assume the simplest form.
22
of the magnetic power of deflexion Am to the electric power of deflexion Ae, for
any velocity, by applying the law
Am
Ae
=
v
c
.
This relationship may be tested experimentally, since the velocity of the
electron can be directly measured, e.g. by means of rapidly oscillating electric
and magnetic fields.
2. From the deduction for the kinetic energy of the electron it follows that
between the potential difference, P, traversed and the acquired velocity v of the
electron there must be the relationship
P = Z
Xdx =
m

c
2
(
1
p
1 − v
2/c2
− 1
)
.
3. We calculate the radius of curvature of the path of the electron when a
magnetic force N is present (as the only deflective force), acting perpendicularly
to the velocity of the electron. From the second of the equations (A) we obtain

d
2y
dt2
=
v
2
R
=

m
v
c
N
r
1 −
v
2
c
2
or
R = mc2

·
v/c
p
1 − v
2/c2
·
1
N
.
These three relationships are a complete expression for the laws according
to which, by the theory here advanced, the electron must move.
In conclusion I wish to say that in working at the problem here dealt with
I have had the loyal assistance of my friend and colleague M. Besso, and that I
am indebted to him for several valuable suggestions.
23
About this Document
This edition of Einstein’s On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies is
based on the English translation of his original 1905 German-language paper
(published as Zur Elektrodynamik bewegter K¨orper, in Annalen der Physik.
17:891, 1905) which appeared in the book The Principle of Relativity, published
in 1923 by Methuen and Company, Ltd. of London. Most of the
papers in that collection are English translations from the German Das Relativatsprinzip,
4th ed., published by in 1922 by Tuebner. All of these sources
are now in the public domain; this document, derived from them, remains in
the public domain and may be reproduced in any manner or medium without
permission, restriction, attribution, or compensation.
Numbered footnotes are as they appeared in the 1923 edition; editor’s
notes are marked by a dagger (†) and appear in sans serif type. The 1923
English translation modified the notation used in Einstein’s 1905 paper to
conform to that in use by the 1920’s; for example, c denotes the speed of
light, as opposed the V used by Einstein in 1905.
This edition was prepared by John Walker. The current version of this
document is available in a variety of formats from the editor’s Web site:
>http://www.fourmilab.ch/
24

ON THE ELECTRODYNAMICS OF MOVING BODIES By A. EINS ip:86.159.16.130 2016-10-22 15:52:04
ahoj

Vladko ip:95.105.231.55 2015-12-16 21:36:45
Hanka, čo tu robíš ešte na starej stránke?
Hybaj na novú alebo na facebook! Nová anketa tu nebude, tu už nebude nič :)

Hanka ip:178.143.73.232 2015-12-16 18:47:12
Kedy bude nová anketa?

Baklažán ip:195.68.234.183 2015-05-30 20:20:15
Čaute,

Aj tento rok sa chystá Dvojkolesovačka trihedronu.

Ide o zhruba päťdňovú letnú bicyklovačku po Slovensku, určenú primárne, ale nielen pre ľudí z trojstenu (nie je to oficiálna akcia trojstenu). Viac o tejto akcii môžete nájsť na jej stránke: https://sites.google.com/site/dvojkolesovackat rihedronu/

Dátum Dvojkolesovačky ešte nie je určený a ak máte záujem ísť na ňu, môžete jej dátum ovplyvniť v tomto doodli: http://doodle.com/pfa2wv5mqh9duqyp . Deadline na hlasovanie je polnoc medzi 6.6. a 7.6., potom sa určí definitívny dátum.

Baklažán

Peto ip:195.12.158.2 2015-03-29 21:28:57
Ak mam na bycikli tachometer, môžem ho v príklade B3 použiť?

Denis ip:185.25.248.196 2015-03-17 21:06:45
Zdravím ,
pri pokus e o registráciu nemám v zozname škôl tú moju , SOŠT Poprad Kukučínova 483/12 , mohli by ste ju prosím doplniť ?
Vopred vďaka

Enka ip:158.195.199.251 2015-01-06 09:33:36
Ahoj Adam,

FKS aj UFO majú osobitné sústredenia. Ak si riešil UFO, tak by si mal byť pozvaný na sústedenie UFO, ktoré bude o pár mesiacov neskôr.

Adam ip:188.112.115.67 2015-01-05 13:14:19
To sústredenie platí aj pre riešiteľov UFO alebo ide čisto len o riešiteľov FKS?

Ďakujem.
Adam

Jimi ip:91.127.185.112 2015-01-04 23:26:23
Ahoj Adam. Sústredenie FKS bude, v dátume 25.1. až 31.1. v Detvianskej Hute.

Adam ip:188.112.115.67 2015-01-04 19:51:24
Čaute,
mám na Vás otázku. Bude alebo nebude sústredenie? Ak áno, tak ako sa dostanem k bližším informáciám?

Ďakujem.
Adam

Marek H. ip:87.197.150.144 2014-11-16 13:51:48
Nazdar, mám dojem, že som z nejakého dôvodu v rebríčku zaznačený dvakrát (tj. ako dve rôzne osoby), pričom jedna z mojich identít má moje body z prvej série a tá druhá teda asi tie z druhej. Smiem požiadať o utriedenie? Ďakujem.

Pepa Svoboda ip:78.128.198.186 2014-11-09 12:44:54
Ahoj,

pro zájemce o historii připomínáme, že korespondenční seminář DěS vstoupil do druhého ročníku a na jeho stránkách http://des.thilisar.cz najdete zadání 1. série.

šimon ip:85.135.141.160 2014-10-21 18:45:13
B4: "bočné plochy s veľkosťou 4S". 4S dokopy, alebo každá?

Paulína ip:90.64.83.26 2014-10-05 16:42:11
Nemohol by ten obrázok dosky po prestrelení nábojom byť pridaný aj do zadaní na internete?

Evka ip:77.234.228.4 2014-09-29 16:11:42
Prosim Vas, kedy bude sustredko a pre kolkych riesitelov za minuly skolsky rok?

Xellos ip:78.128.196.151 2014-06-19 20:55:33
kia: Urcite, Slovaci zvladaju cestinu radovo lepsie ako Cesi slovencinu :D

kia ip:89.24.226.130 2014-06-18 19:58:04
Mohu soutezit i kdyz jsem z ceska, reseni bych psala v cestine

Jana ip:85.216.176.209 2014-05-18 15:54:11
Dakujem :D velmi mala perfekcionisticka cast mojej dusicky bude mat pokoj

Čajka ip:85.135.216.233 2014-05-09 22:29:10
Budem do nich kopat aby to urobili :)

Janka ip:188.167.2.196 2014-04-28 18:51:30
Blizsi tag : FKS
- Posielala som zadania na 2-krat - cast postou a cast cez internet - a nejako divne ste mi tam asi vlozili body lebo moje meno je tam teraz 2-krat a polovica prikladov z tejto serie je pod jednou Janou Sadovskou a druha polovica pod druhou a celkom by ma potesilo keby tuto technicku chybu niekto napravil... Vopred dakujem...

theMinecraftian ip:85.135.196.114 2014-04-15 20:01:46
nemohli by ste pouzivat na texty normalnejsie fonty? Moja tlaciaren mi netlaci diakritiku v slnecnom voze (nefungujeani na jednej z dvoch tlaciarni co mame)

Maru ip:193.87.79.99 2013-11-29 11:05:43
Matúš, jasné, môžeš prísť aj neskôr :)

Maru ip:193.87.79.99 2013-11-29 11:03:43
Ahojte, príďte osláviť Mikuláša skvelou akciou na matfyze. http://akademia.trojsten.sk/Akadémia Trojstenu bude 6.12. V sobotu vás samozrejme čaká Klub.

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